Whoa Dakota has me floating.
— NPR Tiny Desk
 
 
 
patterns_final_typecover_web (1).jpg

Whoa Dakota explores the concept of identity being shaped by patterns that we start to develop during childhood on her debut LP Patterns, dropping August 17. The album showcases her enchanting blend of electropop, R&B and folk, backed by powerhouse vocals. Whoa Dakota will celebrate with dual-city release shows (Little Rock, AR on August 18 and Nashville, TN on August 25) with a fall tour following.

Patterns bounces from 80s-influenced-pop reminiscent of HAIM to indie folk a la Jenny Lewis while artfully maintaining consistency. The title track and debut single “Patterns” serves as a thesis for the entire album:  a brazen examination of "self" that grapples with toxic cycles and emotional accountability through layers of captivating melodies, moody synth and funky guitar. The record is as much about self-discovery as it is about creation of self.

CLICK HERE FOR PATTERNS PRESS RELEASE

Self-reflective pop bliss.
— No Country for New Nashville

Born in Little Rock, AR to a state champion bull rider and a wild child mother, Ott was raised part time on a cattle farm, and part time in the city. The dichotomy of her upbringing is apparent in her sound. The songs range from rocket-soaring electro pop, to stripped down acoustic moments.

The importance of roots and how they shape us is woven throughout her music and visuals. In the prelude to “Toe to Toe,” Ott listens to the story of how her Nanny, 

Hattie Jo, finally made the decision to leave her alcoholic husband, emphasizing that our patterns of remaining in toxic relationships can sometimes be learned, but so can the power we uncover when we make the difficult decision to leave them behind.

A touching moment of empowerment on the album comes on “The Blue Light - Reprise” in which all of Ott’s favorite women recite a note her aunt wrote to her late grandmother, Nanny (whom Ott shares a special bond with). “It gets to the point where you can’t distinguish who’s saying what because this part for me represents the strength available in sisterhood. No matter what our story is and we’re coming from, we’re always stronger together. Sisterhood is going to save us. On an individual and a global level.”  FULL BIO HERE.

Sonically, the tune is an easy-to-love upbeat number with some sinewy funk guitar and sparkly synths. Lyrically, it’s a nuanced examination of a complicated relationship.
— Nashville Scene
 

165k+ Spotify streams. Featured on Spotify's Discover Weekly and Fresh Finds: Six Strings as well as many independent tastemaker playlists.

On a cloud of contagious rhythms, jazzy bass lines, pop-esque keys, and gritty guitar, Whoa Dakota gives a soulful, engaging performance worthy of a standing ovation and a CD purchase.
— The Deli
EFS (1 of 1)-45.jpg